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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuomo from erik. james says in connecticut there are two major problems, the deficit and more taxes. both problems are created by one party rule. what are the big issues in your state? join that conversation on facebook by looking for c-span. let us take a look at the balance of power in state. we can see here who controls the governors' seats. 30 republicans states in red, 19 democratic, and one independent in rhode island. but as your what ray has to say on our democrats line. caller: good morning. i wanted to say that i believe here in the state of texas -- our standard of living is what keeps is going. nobody can live on $7.25 hour. our standard of living is so below the economy it should be at $12 per hour. everything is so expensive right now. it should be, at the very least, $12 per hour. host: you are calling to raise the minimum wage? caller: yes, ma'am. if everybody makes at least $12 an hour, this country would boom so fast. here in the state of texas -- i think it is everywhere. the corruption of the governor and the mayor. big corporate donors, big business owners. they
the class war issue on taxes, which romney was not able to rebutt or make the argument for. look, let's be honest about this. romney was a man who spoke conservatism as a second language. you remember in one of the primary debates he wanted to show up as conservative as he was and he ran a severely conservative administration as governor of massachusetts. severe is a word you associate with head wounds and tropical storms. [laughter] >> not with the government. he had trouble making the case. we have a strong bench, half of whom is here at your conference, young governors, ryan, we have rubio in congress, a whole slew of gun governors, a generation who is adept, you could say marinated in conservative philosophy. thinking very deeply about a new kind of conservatism but they for their own reasons, some personal, some they were simply too new and young and raw, weren't quite ready to not run. we had a weak field in the primaries, extremely weak, of whom romney was obviously the best and only possible presidential candidate. you he was -- but he was weaker than the ones sitting on the b
. when i came into office the governor and general assembly without my support passed a large income tax increase here in the january of twe ven. the sad thing we're now two years into the income tax increase and they raised money and not respond to the problem. i think this year, this spring session of the general assembly it will finally come home to reality. not only downgrades, moody's, fitch and standard have eight watches, warnings or downgrades since the income tax increase has gone into effect. what comes next the fiscal year fourth four, natural revenue growth from illinois coming from sales tax, gaming without tax increases is $600 million. but the reality of the amount of increased payments into the public pension systems is $945 million. i think they will have to deal with this $345 million spread. reality is --. melissa: dan, i applaud your optimism you think this will finally be the come to jesus moment where they realize there is huge problem but i don't know that is necessarily the case because we see california going down the same road. seems like politicians almost neve
: president obama, sworn in yesterday, promising to change the tax code, immigration laws, and act on climate change. good morning, everyone. we will spend the first part of this morning's "washington journal" on yesterday's inaugural address. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for independents, 202-585-3882. also, send us a tweet, twitter.com/c-spanwj. post your comments on facebook, or you can e-mail us. journal@c-span.org. let me begin this morning, this is "the wall street journal," had line. "obama vows aggressive agenda." "he is looking beyond the fiscal battle set to dominate the coming weeks." and then a side story, an analysis. "the president is set to fight over a new to do list." "the inauguration was not only grayer, he sounded less like a man ready for lofty flights and more ready for ground battles." and then here is "the washington post," this morning. there had lyme, "we must act." -- there had line, "we must act -- their headline, "we must act." "the new york times," this morning, "a limitless vision." "speech gives quiet goals center stage." "our jou
't raise taxes is really hard. to do it you have to embrace some really ugly policies, so to understand the trap, what they're about to tell the american people they're going to do you need to quickly understand what is in ryan's original budget. he didn't balance until 2038. so i made a graph for you. i want to be clear away they are. they're the numbers that paul ryan himself gave the congressional budget office. they are his own vision of his plan. they're what happens if everything goes exactly how he wants it to. and so what you're seeing here is the definition between paul ryan's most recent budget and the law as it is currently read. and it is two different things, ten years from now. this gives you a very clear idea up until now of what ryan has been cutting. first, people tend to think that ryan's budget is about medicare. but that is not where he gets savings, at least in the first ten years. it is only about half of gdp, or 10% of his cuts. then, he doesn't touch medicare at all. then there is this category of health care, which is mostly health care for poor people, medicaid
with incentives to take risks and bring ideas from dream to reality. tax credit to help early-stage companies to develop andit's worked in other states, and it's something we can do this session. i will work with the legislature to make it more desirable for small and medium size businesses to hire more people in washington. we must also do a better job commercializing the technologies connecting the dots from the classroom to the laboratory to the marketplace. and no economic strategy would be complete without a transportation plan that facilitates this growth. this session i expect to work with stakeholders that have already committed to a bipartisan plan to build an infrastructure for the next generation. in the next ten years, our population will grow by approximately three quarters of a million people, but we will not be adding one more square inch of dirt. to honestly address our recognize that creativity is just as important as concrete. i want us to turn our innovative spirit towards crafting a transportation package that includes roads, trains, light rail, buses, bike routes and othe
, a trillion dollar tax hike took effect. the senate voted to prevent tax hikes and 90% of americans. and made the lower tax hikes permanent. president obama got less revenue than the speaker offered in the first place. in short, there is no way we were going to get a better deal for the american tax payer. we wanted to keep tax hikes low for everybody. we wanted to cut spending. otherwise every single taxpayer would have paid higher taxes and our economy would have gotten into a nosedive. the decision was simple. if you think a bill needs to pass, you vote for it. many of my colleagues voted the other way. i respect their decision. prudence demands mutual understanding, especially among friends. my colleagues and i saw the same thing. we wanted a smaller, smarter government. we simply differed on the means. that is the difficulty of governing. it should not be a cause for division. our tactics will differ from issue to issue, but our strategy remains the same. in the next four years, opportunity will not come easily. we have to pay our bills and make sure we can pay our bills tomorrow. to do
the taxes that support government expenditures. they paid premiums through their employers for health coverage. they forgo wage increases that could be much higher if health costs were not growing as fast. they believe are the beneficiaries of the whole two trillion dollars in the end. we are not talking about the blood in the streets. people fighting over dwindling -- over a dwindling pie. i would posit that only in health care what the growth from two 0.9 trillion dollars in 2013 to 5.1 trillion dollars in 2023 would be referred to as a shrinking pie. there will be plenty of resources flowing into the health-care system, just not quite as much as would be flowing if nothing was done. we are talking now to give you some sense of the magnitude of this. we are talking about the .rojected health policy twee if you say two trillion dollars in that growth, you would be reducing health spending to only 40 trillion dollars over the next 10 years. you would be cutting the growth in health spending from an estimated 90% under current policy to only 75% over the next two -- over the next 10 ye
in louisiana including the tax reform he's just launched in the past few weeks, what he's doing is trying to think about how at this moment at a time when globalization's putting enormous pressures on working class voters, at a time when the economy is going through a very complicated, difficult moment when it's not clear how to get back to growth, he's thinking creatively about how to use the strength of his state to build on its weaknesseses. and i think at the national level that's what conservatives have to do. to some extempt, it's being done. i would say the policy agenda that has to come at the end of that conversation is not fully worked out by any means, but the questions are being asked. i think the direction of thinking has been helpful even in the wake of the election. if you listen to what people like marco rubio or paul ryan have been saying, it's different from what they themselves were saying six months ago, a year ago. i think the focus is turning to the right place. that doesn't mean that he'll persuade the public, but it certainly helps to ask the right question if you'
.com/thankyoucards to apply. >> remake our government and revamp our tax code. >> the era of liberalism is back. >> medicare and medicaid. >> far left center. >> social security. >> president obama being accused of trying to annihilate the gop by pushing a far left agenda, but is he really that liberal? good shouldn't afternoon to you. i'm craig melvin. you're watching msnbc. we'll also look at how the worlds of sports and politics collide, and this. >> we're all getting a little emotional and sentimental around here. >> hillary clinton bowing out of state department, but she's hardly bowing out of politics. a view from inside hillaryland. that's coming up, and on this international holocaust remembrance day, we talk to nobel peace prize winner ely weizel about what we learned and what we have yet to understand. >> first though guns on the agenda this week in washington. the senate on wednesday will hold first congressional hearing on gun violence since president obama announced his gun control proposals. mark kelley, the husband of former congresswoman gabrielle giffords who was seriously injured in a mass
a background check and pay a fine and back taxes before gaining legal status in the united states. all that is contingent on securing borders. the proposal provides for increased use of drones, more personnel and improved infrastructure and it would create an employment verification system and improve the process for admitting needed workers. cnn chief congressional correspondent dana bash and cnn chief white house correspondent jessica yellin are working the story. dana, the tone was pretty optimistic up on capitol hill today. >> it sure was but, you know, we have seen this movie before, you and i, wolf, and a lot of other people watching this issue go kind of up and down with the partisan wins. but this is something that is different this time. because of something very simple. and that is what happened in the last election to republicans. particularly mitt romney with the latino voters. he lost big time. and that's why when i asked senator mccain and others who were standing right here where i'm standing, half a dozen years ago, why this is different, that's why they answered that w
and the republicans in formulating that tax reduction legislation led to a budget surplus is the touchstone for success in working with the opposing parties to fulfill a president legislative agenda. clinton insightfully appointed erskine bowles to represent him in negotiations with congress. bulls great talent for bargaining was important in reaching the president's legislative agenda. but this is followed by the same house of representatives voting to an each bill clinton, obviously an extreme example, but the age-old conflict between congress and the executive branch of government and get bill clinton was lifted, only seven were elected presidents who were successful. there are lessons to be learned from the clinton's second term that might offer guidance to obama where he reelect me. some of the president to face hostility from congress feel the majority of their own party included washington, jefferson, monroe, grant, theodore roosevelt, johnson and bush. andrew jackson was censured by the congress controlled by democratic party. he never forgave. franklin roosevelt had a constant batt
-class families, of which could then go to educating their kids or building up their savings. tax reform, that is also important for conservatives and republicans. host: a question from our viewer -- guest: tom cotten, the congressman from arkansas, a friend of mine. he went to harvard, which i went to, so i'm biased. he went to harvard law school, which i don't hold against him. he volunteered for the army in 2004, served as an officer in iraq and afghanistan, work for is that business a while, had a close primary against an aggressive womaperson. but he won. there he is, a first term congressman in the house. he will be able to weigh in on the chuck hagel nomination. he has spoken eloquently on that. he is a real rising star in the house. he is already respected by his peers. he was involved with the speaker, paul ryan, and others, in trying to devise a tactical maneuver to get the debt ceiling moved back and to able to deal with sequester. he will have a tough decision in a few months. there's pressure on him in arkansas to run for senate in 2014 against price yoryor, a vulnerable dem
, but does it help anybody? cuts the amount of taxes that gates sends to the federal government to control the meat inspectors and all the wonderful things the government does for us, and so you have to, i think, take cognizance of why the country is great. it's because of the wealth. you can't defeat poverty if you don't create wealth. .. santorum served 14 -- 16 years in congress. did he ever once hisser anything about banning contraceptives? yet, somehow that message was -- it took advantage of all the low-information women voters who just follow joy behar and have no idea that rick santorum and mother teresa believes that contraception is against the catholic teaching. i'm told only 20% of the catholics respect that teaching, but for those who do, it used to be in my time you respected people's religious beliefs you didn't ridicule them or demonize them. i think the fact the democrats were successful -- getting back to negativity -- where was the war on women. they tried to convince that somehow santorum was going to do this and the republicans are against contraception. i think i even
't. every time the government imposes a new tax or sets up more entitlements, it becomes stronger and we the people become weaker that is what inauguration day 2013 was all about. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. let's bring in the aforementioned charles krauthammer from washington. charles, i'm getting tired of the petty politics. i don't believe president obama is the problem. we're the problem, the folks. and you say? i think it will be determined by history. your theory, and there are two. that we get the government we deserve, that obama reflects a change political ideology of the country. more people become dependent more people receiving the benefits of government that there is a lot more people who want to suck on the tit of the state. if i can say that oon your show give a little more spice to it. that is europe. the question you are asking, i think, is are we there? i don't think that the 2012 election is a definitive test of your proposition. the reason is obama did not have a opponent who presented a clear and strong argument for reagan knight perspective of st
be sure to see a litany of anti-coal regulations, tax hikes, anti-second amendment bills, forced unionization bills and crazy new deficit spending. it's the same old mitch mcconnell, same operation. and he will block president obama's agenda. it's basically selling out the efforts of the progressives in this country, in my opinion. let's turn to senator bernie sanders of vermont, who is the only member of the democratic caucus to vote against the so-called filibuster reform. senator, good to have you with us tonight. i'd like you to respond to that fundraising letter of mitch mcconnell. i mean, are things going to change? are we going to see the same old mitch? >> look, at the end of the day, what that legislation did is made it easier for some cabinet appointees to take their jobs. that's important. it's going to speed up the process in the senate. that's important. but at the end of the day, ed, this country faces enormous economic crises. we've got to deal with global warming. we've got to deal with education. we have to deal with deficit reduction. we are not going to be able
was primarily a party of very wealthy people and was only interested in cutting their taxes. they lost the latino vote because mitt romney talked about self deportation and the party of blocked immigration reform. and the african american vote was going to go to president obama. but they jammed it way up with their voter suppression effort. they've got to think more about fundamentals and not just organization. >> and, melissa, will you look at the american people, 68% say it's unacceptable to cut medicaid. 66% disapprove of the gop's negotiation over tax. what they are selling, the american people are not buying. they're in denial. they're acting -- in fact, they're saying that what we have is fundamental principles are right. we're just presenting it wrong. it's not the content they're saying it's the package. no, it's the content. >> you know where this is going to get really real for people on the ground? are these republican governors who are going to continue to try to block president obama's affordable care act that is going to now finally start taking effect on the legislative
ran a great campaign. he created issues out of nothing, like the class war issue on taxes, which romney was not able to make the argument for. let's be honest about this. romney was a man who spoke conservatism as a second language. remember, and one of the primary debates, he wanted to show how conservative he was and he said that he ran a severely conservative administration as governor of massachusetts. severe is a word that you associate with a tropical storm, not the government. [laughter] he had trouble making the case. we have a very strong bench, half of whom is here in your conference. young governors, rubio in congress, and a whole slew of young governors, degeneration -- a generation, you can say they are marinated in conservative philosophy, thinking very deeply about a new kind of conservatism. but they, for their own reasons, some personal and some simply to new and were not quite ready did not run. and we had a weak field in the primaries. romney was obviously the best and the only possible presidential candidate. but he was weaker than the ones who were sitting on
't marginalize it all. >> say on the tax policy, they fought on raising taxes on the rich. 60% to 70% of the public agree with the president on that. so they're marginalized on a lot of policy matters, and the stupid comments don't come out. >> coming out for lower taxes are not going to get you beat. why don't they stick to the strong points? republicans looked ridiculous this week when they decided to go after hillary clinton, who is riding so high in the polls. why did they go after her at the very point she was at her strongest, they attacked. let's take a look. >> i'm glad that you're accepting responsibility. i think that ultimately with your leaving you accept the culpability for the worst tragedy since 9/11, and i really mean that. had i been president at the time and i found that you did not read the cables from benghazi, you did not read the cables from ambassador stevens, i would have relieved you of your post. i think it's inexcusable not to know of the request for security that really i think cost these people their lives. >> madam secretary, you let the consulate become
of the electorate behind them. >> very briefly, jared, if you can, eric cantor says taxes are done, no taxes, so i guess another stalemate to come on that? >> i see -- it's hard to see how the budget that's going to come out of the senate, and i think patty murray is going to do a very good job on that, is going to reconcile with the kind of budgets we're looking at. >> jared bernstein who absolutely deserves the nobel peace prize, thank you, sir, thank you for joining us. and we'll be right back. ♪ alright, let's go. ♪ shimmy, shimmy chocolate. ♪ shimmy, shimmy chocolate. ♪ we, we chocolate cross over. ♪ yeah, we chocolate cross over. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing fiber one 80 calorie chocolate cereal. ♪ chocolate. 80 calorie chocolate cereal. did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. ju
island hold there so big money people can come there and shelter their tax money and stuff like that. >> stephanie: awesome. >> caller: isn't that a great idea? >> stephanie: right. and no rules or regulations of any kind. no stoplights or stop signs just go. >> are you tired of your government taking away liberties and freedoms you can't quite name. welcome welcome susseed with us. your hard-earned money is yours to teen. there are no taxes in -- glen becky becky becky becky stan stan. >> there are no roads, police teachers, libraries, garbage pickup or sewage statement in -- >> glen becky becky becky becky stan stan. >> but you will friend off the wild animals and then the survivalist train willing kick in. who needs government. it is over rated. join us in -- >> glen becky becky stan stan. >> want to shoot your gun in all directions, go ahead. with a small down payment it can be yours. >> above the fruited plains. >> our future is in the past. >> stephanie: good call, producer chris. >> thank you. >> stephanie: you just dropped that out of nowhere. >> i did. it was
the federal deficit in just ten years. and only through spending cuts and no new taxes whatsoever. to do this mr. ryan would have to cut every government operation by one-sixth or if he choose not to touch entitlements or defense, he would have to cut every government operation by almost 40%. this country would be plunged into a recession. and that's the ryan budget. thanks so much for watching. chris matthews and "hardball" is next. >>> mad house. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this eruption of self-doubt and humiliation in the republican party. suddenly after months of denial, you hear the growling and the gnashing of teeth. it's if as if we're hearing the cries from hell. peggy noonan says the grand old party is doomed if it keeps knocking hillary and refusing to recognize that excuse me for disrupting your illusion, president obama is the president and republicans in the house that once could still see through the dark know they really can't go on like this. margaret is not alone. down in baton rouge governor b
for gay people, 60%. on aid to the poor, 59%, on tax levels for millionaires and big corporation, 59%. women's issue, 55%. immigration, 55%. i mean, these are high numbers of people feeling the gop is out of touch on these issues. >> yeah, i mean, reverend al, the shocking thing is, as you just laid out, the support for democratic policies is even h h higher than support for democratic politicians. the president won a decisive victory, but the support for the issues and policies is going to push is even higher. so the republicans are delusional to be saying that the issue is just a matter of reaching out or modernizing technology and that their principles are sound. it's their principles and policies that were rejected by the voters and that continues. and you're right, too, to point to that symbolism of that awful chair. i mean, that was the worst moment of a terrible convention. >> in the chair of the gop's office. what could you be thinking about? >> right, a cranky old man lecturing our first african american president in prime time in tampa helped take the party down. but while
job approval on handling the economy, taxes, unemployment, spending, gas prices. we are not the only people who knew that. chicago knew that, too. they were good to do something about that. then it was, about 42%. romney has been a job creator. he has made things. he has balanced budgets. he has hired and fired people. he will take a business experience and put it to washington. a couple things wrong with that. one is, the economy by itself, romney and obama were 43 and 44% each. you need 51% or above to win. the obama people kept adding points for women, immigration, hurricane sandy. they were able to get their realization that economy may be most important,, but it is not the only thing. you only had to choose one candidate, you do not have to choose one issue. where do people who believe in free well, human reason, intelligence and your ability and have issues that are important to you. now republicans dealing with fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and sequestration -- the average family in this country lives with debt. quite a bit of that. they do not look at that as a bad thing. it
that in our tax code. our tax code is so complicated because there are so many giveaways to the special interest groups or the well-connected that don't privilege americans that work hard and try to put food on the table. >> i have often wondered and explored this if people have an appetite for limited government? americans in general, the government keeps getting bigger. we struggle to obtain the a slower right of growth, which is a great vibtry in a way it is. have you found an appetite for limited government? or limited government for others and not for themselves? >> i believe so. i said often times in the campaign trail that the constitution is very popular and big government is not popular. that is where we should anchor our program and policies. you saw this in the president's speech on monday even though it was a very liberal speech. he didn't call for big government. >> the inaugural address? >> yeah, the inaugural address. that's because he knows what bill clinton knew in 1996, that big government is over. so i do think -- >> the era is over. >> yeah. again, if political leade
and vote in common ground measures. don't tax things that people think are the killing of human beings. >> okay, great. >> go ahead and allow parental consent. >> i don't think you can put a woman in prison for having an abortion. >> have i said that? have i said that? >> you're talking around it. >> no, i'm not at all. i'm talking about common ground. >> every time i talk about someone outlawing abortion or banning it, what is the law? please tell me what the law is in simple english. >> why did you ever have a sentiment in this regard at all? why did you ever feel there was any -- >> because i want to know what the position is of the pro-life people on the law. please tell me. it's not about morality. >> it's the humanity of the unborn child and humanity of the. with a. and the law should be common ground. common ground now is lack of specific planning. >> until you do, i have a hard time understanding the pro-life. >> that's a great talking point, but that's not really working out. >> back your talking point with a pack. thank you, terry o'neill, and marjorie dannenfelser. we'll be
opinion and law and go ahead and vote in common ground measures. don't tax things that people think are the killing of human beings. >> great. i'm having a hard time. i don't think you could put a woman in prison for having an abortion. >> have i said that? >> because you're talking around it. >> i'm not at all. i'm talking about common ground. >> every time i hear someone talking about banning abortion or making illegal. >> why did you ever feel that there was any -- >> because i want to know what the position is of the pro-life people on the law. >> it's humanity of the unborn child and the humanity of the woman. >> i can't get into these. thank you. >> common ground law -- >> six years in jail, 20 years in jail. tell me the punishment. >> that's a great talking point but that's not working out. >> with a fact. thank you terry o'neill and marjorie dnnenfel. come back if you have an answer to the question. we'll be right back. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb st
to be able to tax wall street now. minimum wage, that's out the door, raising that. workers' rights. and you know what this is all about in my opinion? this is about guns. harry reid knows that 51 votes would be available for the assault weapons ban but he knows damn well there won't be 60 and he doesn't want to hang this on the democratic party at all to all these rural senators. that's who he's protecting in this. but he is not standing up for the people at all. i just -- i don't know what kind of message can we send at this point? >> i think we send a message of total determination that as every issue is discussed and if mitch mcconnell has to sign off to put it on the floor, which is where we believe this lies, then on every issue we have to link this up and say you said if it wasn't functioning you would change it? 51 can change it. we're fighting to change it. and not let up for a minute. and the broader democracy initiative that we're a part of has got to go on on all the issues. >> this is another comment that struck me today. tpm asked senator dick durbin today if the deal would mak
friend. >>> let's check in with anderson cooper. >>> billions of your tax dollars used and not much to show for it. this is outrageous. it was money wasted under the pretense of transforming a rail system. we're keeping them honest. they weren't such good pals. hillary clinton, president obama cap off a run as secretary of state on a sit-down interview on "60 minutes." >>> he was an inspiration to photo journalists around the world. tim heathering ton died doing what he does best, what happened in the midst of world. libya, 40 years old, he was a friend to this program. i'll speak to his close friend and colleague sebastian younger who put together an amazing documentary celebrating his life. that and more at the top of the hour. >>> our fifth story "outfront," changing the rules of the game. republicans in a number of states that president obama won in november want to change the way electoral votes in their states are distributed. currently all states except nebraska and maine award all electoral votes to one candidate. states like virginia, michigan, pennsylvania, and ohio are lo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)